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Karel Funk

In the studio: Karel Funk

Contemporary urbanism meets the traditions of Renaissance portraiture. Unlike the classical painters, who were focused on their character’s faces, Canadian artist Karel Funk takes a closer look at people’s hoodies – the attributes of street wear often overlooked. The subjects in his paintings are completely anonymous yet retain individuality, still but not static, concealed yet …

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Karel Funk talks about painting hoodies in the style of the Old Masters

A realist painter who uses the term “urban voyeurism” to describe his approach, Karel Funk creates portraits of subjects at odd close-up angles, as though they were standing next to you on a crowded train or bus. Born in Winnipeg, Manitoba—where he still lives—Funk studied at Columbia University. Combining an interest in the Old Masters …

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The Voyeuristic Work of Karel Funk, National Gallery of Canada

Praised by the New York Times as “outstanding” and “suffused with an unexpected spirituality,” Karel Funk’s paintings have been purchased by the likes of the Guggenheim, the Whitney, the National Gallery of Canada, and the Art Gallery of Ontario. The Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG) show Karel Funk, on view until October 2, is the first major survey of Funk’s oeuvre …

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Karel Funk in The Globe and Mail

Hyperrealist artist Karel Funk’s paintings to be shown in WinnipegMarsha LedermanThe Globe and MailPublished Sunday, Jun. 05, 2016 12:00PM EDTWinnipeg artist Karel Funk has received international attention for his hooded figures – stark and contemporary urban works that at the same time draw heavily on historical religious art. Read more 

Karel Funk in 303 Gallery

Karel Funk creates astonishingly detailed and hauntingly quiet paintings that at once rely on and challenge conventional notions of portraiture. Historically, portraits were painted with an agenda. Preeminent figures with the means to commission such work were portrayed to emphasize real or desired attributes, seeking to command admiration and respect from the viewer. Most often …

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