Alex Tedlie-Stursberg

UTOPOS

If this is paradise I wish I had a lawnmower – Talking Heads, 1988

The title for this exhibition is taken from the Greek term, Ou-topos; Ou (not) and Topos (a place). The term Utopos holds two other meanings: the first being “the good place” and the second “the place that cannot be.” In the Talking Heads song “Nothing but Flowers,” David Byrne’s lyrics follow a similar path by embodying this shared meaning of Utopos, where yes, the grass really is greener on the other side of the fence, but, upon reflection, neither greens—nor grass for that matter—are all they were cracked up to be. Be careful what you wish for. You might get it and regret it.

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Alex Tedlie-Stursberg

SOUS LA PLAGE, LES PAVÉS: ALEX TEDLIE STURSBERG

Charles Baudelaire, the 19th Century poet and art critic, saw the ‘ragpicker’ as an allegorical figure able to convey the essence of consumer capitalism:

Here we have a man whose job it is to gather the day’s refuse in the capital. Everything that the big city has thrown away, everything it has lost, everything it has scorned, everything it has crushed underfoot he catalogues and collects. He collates the annals of intemperance, the capharnaum of waste. He sorts things out and selects judiciously; he collects, like a miser guarding a treasure, refuse which will assume the shape of useful or gratifying objects between the jaws of the goddess of Industry.

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Alex Tedlie-Stursberg

BAF: Everything Flows

Adorned with the steadily accumulating debris of contemporary life—plastics, Styrofoam, bottle caps, and pennies—the sculptures in Alex Tedlie-Stursberg’s Everything Flows exude, despite their manufactured origins, an aura of the organic. Often they evoke ancient things: fossilised forests, archaeological artefacts, coral reefs, alien planets. Poised between the artificial and the artisanal, the ready-made and the hand-made, they display a trippy, absurd quality that belie Tedlie-Stursberg’s thoughtful engagement with humanity’s discarded materials and the value systems that help create them.

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Alex Tedlie-Stursberg

BAF In Conversation: Alex Tedlie Stursberg

Alex Tedlie-Stursberg explores the constantly flowing streams of interactions and transactions that make up our society in a practice that combines sculpture, assemblage and collage. Interested in the “bottom end of the market”, Tedlie-Stursberg’s works tend to incorporate what might be bluntly referred to as garbage – not just waste and discarded objects, but actual earth and soil. The finished works exude an eccentric, fantastical energy, seeming to come neither from the future nor the past, but perhaps an alternate timeline or dimension. This humour and irreverence characterizes Tedlie-Stursberg’s practice; in the past, he has created video art from a Ron Perlman movie and a mock campfire from found objects.

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Karin Bubaš

Scout: New “Three-Dimensional Photography” Exhibition Opens in Abbotsford This Friday

A photograph is a photograph is a… sculpture? Experience photography in new ways at The Reach Gallery Museum’s latest exhibition, image/object: new approaches to three-dimensional photography, opening in Abbotsford on Friday, January 27th.

Through the work of three contemporary Canadian artists – Karin Bubaš, Natalie Hunter, and Karen Zalamea – image/object explores the potential for photographic images to be spatial, experiential and material. Each artist, however, approaches photography uniquely.

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Holger Kalberg

Holger Kalberg | New Artist

Holger Kalberg was born in Germany and currently lives and works in Winnipeg, Manitoba. He graduated from Emily Carr University (BFA, 2001) and the Chelsea School of Art in London (MFA, 2007). Kalberg has been shortlisted for the RBC Painting Competition on three separate occasions, and served on the jury for the 2013 award. Kalberg has recently exhibited at the Vancouver Art Gallery, the University of Manitoba, the Belkin Satellite Gallery, and the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. His work is collected by the Royal Bank of Canada, the Vancouver Art Gallery, TD Bank, the Belkin Gallery, and numerous other public and private collections.

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Alex Morrison

Through the Lattice

Through the Lattice reflects upon the ongoing relevance of the lived environment, whether as owned, alienated, or desired. Each artist foregrounds the role of place—and its aesthetics of style, ornament, design, pattern, and architecture—in their recent works. Though diverse in their methods, the artists share a concern with the deeper meanings of space as well as its material construction.

“Where and how we inhabit space has been the subject of intense discussion as of late,” says exhibition curator Rhys Edwards. “Lockdown protocols, safe living spaces, and affordable housing are very current topics. I wanted to organize an exhibition of artworks that demonstrates how many artists have been responding to the idea of dwelling in recent times.”

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Emily Hermant

LVL3, Dial Tone, Chicago

LVL3 proudly presents Dial Tone, a three-person exhibition featuring Kevin Umaña, Cathy Hsaio, and Emily Hermant. In Dial Tone, Like a visual telegraph, the artists use their disparate iconographies to flag us down in hopes of a conversation.

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Alex Morrison

A Word for Underfoot; The Sun at Hunt Gallery

Gold’s status as a precious metal is tied to a variety of factors, its relative scarcity, its exceedingly difficult extraction, its applications as a key resource across an expansive list of industries. Most of all, however, it is gold’s lustrous, radiant finish that defines and preserves its status at the forefront of our covetousness. It is this same glimmering luminosity that seems universal amongst the objects to which we ascribe most value. Silver, platinum, diamonds, and rubies share it, and it is a fundamental quality of the single most important and enduring object planet earth has ever known: The Sun. And just as gold bears a Midasian list of cautions that accompany our greed for it, so too does The Sun. For every crop grown and flower bloomed, so too does our skin burn and pictures fade by its same light. And it is here, with The Sun and our paradoxical relationship to it, that the most recent show at Hunt Gallery finds its source.

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Jeremy Hof

Jeremy Hof: New Work

Jeremy Hof’s paintings are compellingly sculptural, built from countless layers of acrylic paint over an extended time period in his studio. Many are strategically hand-sanded to expose their construction, revealing the artist’s premeditated colour aesthetic, whether subtly gradient, strikingly optic, or sometimes psychedelic and kaleidoscopic. Hof’s work has been exhibited at the National Gallery of Canada, the Vancouver Art Gallery, the Ottawa Art Gallery, the Richmond Art Gallery, Galerie de l’UQAM, the Mendel Art Gallery, the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, the Power Plant, the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (MOCCA), and numerous other venues. His work is collected by the Vancouver Art Gallery, BMO collection, RBC collection, TD Bank collection, and others. In 2008, Hof was the winner of the RBC Painting Competition.

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Greg Girard

CNN: Vintage photos show underbelly of boom-era Japan

When celebrated photographer Greg Girard landed in Tokyo in April 1976, he expected to spend only a few days in the Japanese capital. At that time a “broke traveler” in his early 20s, he was headed to more affordable destinations in southeast Asia.

He left his luggage at Haneda Airport and, with nowhere to sleep, spent his first night in Tokyo roaming the streets of the city’s lively Shinjuku district, camera in hand.

“I was just floored by the way everything looked, because it was never presented in the West, this modern city,” Girard recalled in a video interview, noting that his arrival was long before movies like “Blade Runner” and ’90s pop culture exposed mainstream Western audiences to Asian metropolises.

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Uncategorized

Cultural scene mourns Vancouver contemporary artist Rodney Graham

INFLUENTIAL, HIGHLY RESPECTED contemporary-art giant Rodney Graham passed away Saturday at 73.

Condolences are pouring onto social media from around the world. In an announcement, the four galleries who represented him—303 Gallery, Hauser & Wirth, Lisson Gallery, Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle and Esther Schipper—said he had been battling cancer.

Born in Abbotsford, Graham emerged from the 1970s’ photoconceptual movement in this city—the “Vancouver School” that gave rise to names like Jeff Wall, Roy Arden, and Ken Lum—putting his own unique, cheeky, and genre-busting twist on it. He was known for referencing the art-historical, the literary, the philosophical, and especially the cinematic and the musical.

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Greg Girard

Greg Girard Takes Us Back In Time to a Pre-Bubble Tokyo for ‘JAL 76 88’

I’ll never forget the first time I came across City of Darkness: Life in Kowloon Walled City by Greg Girard. Even if the entire lawless enclave was long demolished by the time I made it to Hong Kong, the book was one of the reasons that I made the venture to the city. Girard’s ability to put viewers right in the middle of his clandestine locations transports you, not only back in time, but allows you to feel the rawness of each situation.

In his newest book, JAL 76 88, the Vancouver, British Columbia native highlights photographs he took from the years 1976 to 1988 in Tokyo, Japan. What was supposed to be a quick few days quickly led to weeks as the futuristic city enthralled his senses and fed his appetite for discovery and documentation. Spanning over a decade, the works in JAL 76 88 see the urban jungle of Tokyo through the lens of Girard as social and physical transformations were taking place from the pre-bubble era, the full-on explosion in wealth afforded by the bubble economy, and the cusp of what we now know as the Lost Decade.

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Emily Hermant

Transpositions

Transpositions is the final in a three-part series of exhibitions that explore connections between textiles and technology. Building on the preceding exhibitions Interweavings and Remediations, the artists selected for Transpositions offer an expanded understanding of textile construction. Using non-traditional media such as wire, rubber, photographs, or insulation they transpose the technologies of weaving or braiding onto their chosen materials.

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Greg Girard

A New Book Features Otherworldly Photographs of Japan in the 1970s

Every city is home to thousands of stories. If you look through photographer Greg Girard’s new book JAL 76-88, you’ll find dozens of evocative images taken across Japan in the 1970s and 1980s. Some feature neon-drenched urban landscapes, the kind of haunted cityscape that seems tailor-made for the opening shot of a film noir.

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Alex Morrison

Skateboarding meets contemporary art in Out of Control

WHEN PATRIK ANDERSSON began working on Out of Control: The Concrete Art of Skateboarding, a major new exhibition at Audain Art Museum, he was clear on what wouldn’t be part of the show. Flips and shove-it tricks are not the focus, and there’s no tribute to legend Tony Hawk.

“I tried very hard—and it was quite difficult—not to make a predictable show about famous skateboarders or famous artists associated with skateboarding,” Andersson tells Stir by phone. “A conscious decision was that I’ve done my best not to make any mention of skateboarding as a sport. I don’t think it’s a sport. It’s become a sport. We can’t argue that; it’s in the Olympics. But this exhibition is not looking at that.”

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Alex Morrison

Audain Art Museum gets Out of Control with playful exhibition highlighting the intersection between contemporary art and skateboarding

WHISTLER, BC, Sept. 6, 2022 /CNW/ – Out of Control: The Concrete Art of Skateboarding invites skaters and non-skaters alike to reimagine their collective understanding of skateboarding and reflect on its contemporary relevance. Opening on September 17, this ambitious group exhibition at the Audain Art Museum (AAM) brings together nineteen BC and international artists who embody diversity in their practice and explore the aesthetic, social, environmental, political, and architectural aspects of skateboarding.

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Karin Bubaš

Arts Umbrella’s Splash Art Auction celebrates 40 years

Arts Umbrella has just announced that it will celebrate the 40th anniversary of its Splash Art Auction at the Fairmont Hotel on Saturday, October 22.

This year’s auction will feature nearly 100 pieces of work from emerging and established local, national, and international artists, including Dana Claxton, Andrew Dadson, Karin Bubaš, Brent Wadden, Bobbie Burgers, Marie Khouri, and Russna Kaur.

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Emily Hermant

Emily Hermant | Alberta Magazine Awards Finalist

Vancouver-based interdisciplinary artist Emily Hermant works with recycled telecommunications and data cables, stripping them down and arranging them into patterns, casting them in silicone to make colourful moulded wall hangings, or creating rippling sculptures from the wires themselves. “The materials that I’m working with have speed built into them,” says Hermant, a professor of sculpture and expanded media at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design. “They have a purpose, which is to connect across these large distances to allow people to communicate really instantaneously.”

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Greg Girard

Aesthetica Magazine – A Neon-Soaked City

Ridley Scott’s film adaptation of Blade Runner came out in 1982. It’s since become the blueprint for high-tech, neon-soaked dystopia and cyberpunk aesthetics: cities emblazoned with colourful billboards and 24-hour artificial light. Six years prior to its release, Canadian photographer Greg Girard (b. 1955) arrived in Tokyo. “Blade Runner-esque” had yet to enter the lexicon, and he was soon entranced by this modern, futuristic city. Girard quickly turned his lens on the city’s people and glowing nocturnal architecture. Now, this largely unseen collection of images is published in a new book: JAL 76 88.

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Gailan Ngan

Gailan Ngan, Fundamental forms for now, here and beyond – Galleries West

Vancouver artist Gailan Ngan’s From the Studio Floor presents a collection of works that are playful and inviting despite their weighty materials. The exhibition, on view at the Esker Foundation in Calgary until Dec. 18, brings together found materials such as chunks of clay and a cactus, with a series of ceramic sculptures collectively titled Moon Orbit, which Ngan describes as “blobs.” They look like colourful boulders from outer space but are mostly made of clay from British Columbia.

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Uncategorized

E’yles’lek Claude “Rocky” LaRock at Art Gallery at Evergreen

The Art Gallery at Evergreen is proud to announce its presentation of Semá:th Xó:tsa: Sts’ólemeqwelh Sxó:tsa/Great Gramma’s Lake. In November 2021, extreme rains flooded extensive areas of the Fraser Valley, including what is today known as Sumas Prairie. This “once in a century” flooding has dramatically impacted the lives and livelihoods of many Fraser Valley residents, including Stó:lō master carver E’yies’lek Claude “Rocky” LaRock.

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Alison Yip

Alison Yip – june, Berlin

Sleeping In examines notions of safety and rest, and their inextricable relationship to an individual’s most intimate space of a home—a site of shelter, coziness, and domesticity. The artists in this exhibition, CONNY (Tanja Nis-Hansen and Niclas Riepshoff), Antonia Nannt, Tanja Nis-Hansen, Jessy Razafimandimby, and Alison Yip navigate the ideas of comfort and tease out the individual that exists at the contentious bounds of productivity and rest, and wakefulness and slumber.

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Gailan Ngan

Gailan Ngan – Esker Foundation

Gailan Ngan: What Goes Around Comes Around

The seemly interchangeable right and wrong in the phrase, in the wrong place at the wrong time, or the right place at the right time, offers several ways to consider the role location has in fate. Regardless of interpretation, assigning value seems irrelevant; it is more interesting to be in a place for something to cross your path, recognize the significance of this, and alter the course of your movement through this world because of the encounter.

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Mari Eastman

Mari Eastman – Frieze

The night air around Soon-Yi Previn, as Mari Eastman has rendered it, is overbearing. Surrounded by short, effusive brushstrokes, Previn’s impervious silhouette is further peppered by inky blue daubs. A chatty young Moses Farrow stands beside her, the red folds of his jacket matching an awning above (Soon-yi and Moses, 2021). The poolside portrait of a girl that opens ‘Night Life’, Eastman’s second solo exhibition at Goldfinch in Chicago, is executed with similar aplomb. Untitled (Sanded Painting) (2021) is atmospherically grey-pink and lavender; the girl, bored but assured, sits with one leg propped up. Any rococo resonances, however, are challenged by her completely sanded face and body; the abrasions give the effect of splitting light.

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Uncategorized

Alex Morrison – Scout

Mushrooms, furniture, and patterns proliferate in Nooks and Corners, Vancouver-based artist Alex Morrison’s new exhibition, opening January 28th at the Contemporary Art Gallery in downtown Vancouver.

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Stephen Waddell

Stephen Waddell – Audain Tuesday Night Talks

Season 3 of the Audain Art Museum’s (AAM) immensely popular Tuesday Night Talks (TNT) offers a unique opportunity for online participants to simultaneously enter the Museum and the artist’s studio or home during the evening, while learning about key works in the AAM’s Permanent Collection directly from their respective makers.

Hosted by the Museum’s Director & Chief Curator, Dr. Curtis Collins, this sixth Episode features Stephen Waddell a Vancouver-based artist who received a Master of Fine Arts from the University of British Columbia in 1994.

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Greg Girard

Greg Girard – Mixmag

In 1974, Greg Girard arrived in Hong Kong on a freighter from San Francisco armed with not just a camera slung over his shoulder but a starry-eyed vision of capturing the raw electricity that was charging through the rapidly changing continent at night. With Asia full of promise and infinite possibilities, the Canadian photographer was at once spellbound and spent the 30 years that followed navigating the chaotic yet unencumbered neon-lit alleys of Hong Kong, Shanghai, Tokyo, Thailand and Vietnam.

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Greg Girard

Greg Girard – The Times

The Canadian photographer Greg Girard only intended to stay a few days in Tokyo when he arrived in 1976. “I spent the night wandering around Shinjuku and nearby neighbourhoods, and by morning I knew I wanted to stay,” he says in his new book, JAL 76 88 (the initials stand for Japan Airlines, while the numbers refer to the years the work spans).

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Roy Arden

Roy Arden, Pictures and Promises

Drawn from the Vancouver Art Gallery’s rich photographic holdings, Pictures and Promises focuses on lens-based works that employ the structures, conventions and formal qualities used

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Greg Girard

Greg Girard, Fitchburg Art Museum

The BIG Picture: Giant Photographs and Powerful Portfolios is a two-part exhibition that highlights recent photography acquisitions at the Fitchburg Art Museum. The Giant Photographs

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Alison Yip

Alison Yip, Dortmunder Kunstverein

Alison Yip’s works negotiate the role of fantasy in a post-factual world and incorporate parapsychological derivations from figurative representation. Based on painting, the artist creates

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Karin Bubaš

Karin Bubaš, Fitchburg Art Museum

The BIG Picture: Giant Photographs and Powerful Portfolios is a two-part exhibition that highlights recent photography acquisitions at the Fitchburg Art Museum. The Giant Photographs

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Evan Lee

Evan Lee, Artforum

Evan Lee’s series of paintings “Fortune Happiness,” 2018, is distinguished by long shadows and listless figures that might be found in Edward Hopper’s canvases. But

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Tim Gardner

Tim Gardner, 303 Gallery

Anniversary publication & exhibition celebrating 35 years of 303 Gallery 303 Gallery: 35 Years is a new hardcover publication chronicling the story of the gallery

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Colleen Heslin

Colleen Heslin, The Reach

Something More than Nothing brings together a diverse group of artists whose work all deals in some way with notions of hidden or invisible labour:

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Greg Girard

Greg Girard, designboom

to mark the release of his latest book, ‘tokyo-yokosuka 1976-1983’, greg girard has shared a collection of largely unseen images offering a nostalgic glimpse of

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Greg Girard

Greg Girard, The Georgia Straight

Greg Girard’s photographs of Asian cityscapes, notably shot in Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Hanoi, have firmly established his reputation, both locally and internationally. During the

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Roy Arden

Roy Arden, Art Forum

Anna Atkins, the Victorian botanist widely considered the first female photographer, created thousands of cyanotypes depicting white negatives of flora, often seaweed, suspended in atmospheres

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Emily Hermant

Emily Hermant | The Bakery

Emily Hermant is an interdisciplinary artist whose sculptures, drawings, and installations explore themes of communication, gendered labor, and the spatial experiences of the body. She

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Roy Arden

Roy Arden, Musée Magazine

The mid 19th century was an era of philosophical and scientific advance. The Naturalism fad possessed middle and upper classes with an obsession for paleontology,

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Greg Girard

Greg Girard, Capitalist Realism

In this year’s Thessaloniki PhotoBiennale 2018, the central exhibition entitled “Capitalist Realism“, which is structured in two large sections, at the Thessaloniki Museum of Photography

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Alison Yip

Alison Yip, Peripheral Review

Last year a number exhibitions, events and talks addressed the state of contemporary painting in Vancouver. The following essay is a belated survey of these

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Roy Arden

Roy Arden, Hessel Museum of Art

Artists include: Roy Arden, Alex Bag, Art Club 2000, Lutz Bacher, Dennis Balk, Bernadette Corporation, J. St. Bernard, Tom Burr, Moyra Davey, Jessica Diamond, Stephan

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Scott McFarland

Scott McFarland, Artforum

Toronto-based artist Scott McFarland doesn’t represent reality—he cultivates it. He is best known for creating dense composite landscapes—often gardens—that conflate the temporal and spatial coordinates

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Emily Hermant

The Material Turn

The Material Turn exhibition presents international and intergenerational conversations around contemporary textile practices in the digital information age. In particular, the materiality of digital technologies is

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Jeremy Hof

Jeremy Hof, Georgia Straight

Entangled is a big, energetic, and engaging exhibition. It trots us past an abundance of contemporary works, from John Heward’s hanging pieces of paint-stained fabric

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Jeremy Hof

Jeremy Hof, Vancouver Sun

They look like coloured blocks of concrete left over from a construction site or maybe rocks used in some industrial process. In fact, they’re leftovers

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Mari Eastman

Mari Eastman, Newcity

Painter Mari Eastman has spent the better part of the last two decades cultivating a visual aesthetic that is at once breezy and self-assured. Pastel-hued,

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Jeremy Hof

Jeremy Hof, Vancouver Sun

The Vancouver Art Gallery is about to open an exhibition about contemporary painting. Some people might be tempted to say, “It’s about time.” To art

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Graham Gillmore

The Art of Words

The work of Vancouver artist Graham Gillmore could attract curious writers just as easily as it attracts art lovers. Whether he creates a painting, panel or

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Karin Bubaš

Karin Bubaš: Hidden Valley

In Karin Bubaš’ newest exhibition Hidden Valley, the artist presents a suite of large-scale, colour-shifting photographs shot in California in 2016 and 2017. Bubaš has

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Emily Hermant

Emily Hermant | LVL3

Tell us a little bit about yourself and what you do. I’m an interdisciplinary artist who makes sculptures, drawings, and installations. I’m Canadian. I moved to

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Roy Arden

Bang! Kaboom! Art!

The rubble from a “concert” in which a piano gets smashed; a
sculpture that slowly pushes apart its gallery; a drawing by a modern master…

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Karel Funk

Karel Funk in 303 Gallery

Karel Funk creates astonishingly detailed and hauntingly quiet paintings that at once rely on and challenge conventional notions of portraiture. Historically, portraits were painted with

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Karel Funk

Karel Funk – 303 Gallery

Karel Funk’s hyperrealist painting immediately commands attention. Influenced by 17th century Dutch and Flemish painters and by Renaissance portraiture, Funk depicts torsos and heads of

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Scott McFarland

CAG: Scott McFarland, Coastal Cabin

Scott McFarland is a photographer whose images are highlighted by meticulous staging and high-production values. McFarland documents a discrete range of subjects in ongoing suites,

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